PRODUCT CLAIMS

This product treats the PAST issues of problematic skin in

the following ways:

Helps decrease the appearance of rough texture and discoloration from past acne.

Smooths and evens skin tone, reducing the appearance of

discoloration caused by past breakouts.

Helps minimize the appearance of scars.


.. of past acne, such as textural damage, hyperpigmentation, and acne scars... 

 

 



If you are having issues with acne and acne scarring NUSKIN products and the galvonic spa treatment system may be what you've been looking for, especially when it comes to reducing / minimizing unsightly scars.


 

ACNE VIDEOS: NuSkin products


Nu Skin Clear Action Medical System (Acne). Scientifically proven!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bwyec80eks


My First Day with Clear Action

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFJ_47qpkHM&feature=related


Download "A Guide To Common Skin Disorders"

click on link to download


 

ns common skin disorders 5-26-2012 4;25;50 


PM.PDF




 

 

ARTICLES: Relating to ACNE and the treatment of …

 

 


 

Acne

Acne affects people regardless of age, gender, or race. For example, consider the following statistics: 60 million Americans have active acne (20 percent of whom are adults); of the 85 percent of young adults (between ages 12 and 24) who suffer from acne, 25 percent will have permanent scars from acne. Clearly, acne is a problem that affects many people. This article addresses the following issues: 1) What is acne? 2) What are the three stages of the acne life cycle? and 3) What is the best way to treat acne?


What Is Acne?
Acne is a term for plugged pores, pimples, and cysts. If a pore becomes clogged, then closes and bulges out, you have a whitehead (also known as a closed comedone). If a pore becomes clogged but stays open and the top darkens, you have a blackhead (also known as an open comedone). Two other types of acne include pimples and deeper lumps (cysts or nodules). When the walls of a pore become damaged, bacteria (called Propionibacterium acnes, or P. acnes) and dead skin can work their way under the living skin. This leaves you with a small, red infection called a pimple. Clogged pores that are deep in the skin cause cysts. These infections are generally larger than those that cause pimples. The causes of acne are most easily understood by looking at the three stages of the acne life cycle: clogged pores, bacteria, inflammation.


Three Stages of the Acne Life Cycle
The first stage is clogged pores. Just as skin cells on the skin's surface are constantly being sloughed off and renewed, dead skin cells are sloughed off the skin inside the pore as well. When oil and dead skin cells get trapped in the narrow opening of the pore, this can cause cells to clump and form a plug.


The second stage in the acne life cycle involves the infiltration of bacteria. Normally found on the skin, the P. acnes bacteria can feed and breed inside clogged hair follicles where sebum is trapped. Your body responds by sending white blood cells to fight these bacterial invaders.


This leads to the next stage in the acne life cycle—inflammation. As the body fights the bacteria, your skin becomes inflamed and small pink bumps, pimples, nodules, or cysts appear.


Treating Acne
Unfortunately, acne is more than just a temporary concern. Acne is an inflammatory condition that can result in scarring and discoloration from past acne that can actually lead to future acne. Thus, while acne can be remedied, it's important to do so correctly in order to prevent greater damage to your skin. Effectively treating acne takes a total approach:


  • Past acne. Treatment should address the effects of past acne, such as textural damage, hyperpigmentation, and acne scars.

  • Present acne. Treatment should address the issues of present acne, such as redness, irritation, breakouts, oiliness, and blackheads. This is accomplished by opening the pores and reducing bacteria, oil production, and inflammation.

  • Future acne. An effective treatment program should also address future acne by keeping pores open, preventing scarring and future acne breakouts, and inhibiting discoloration.


Because acne can begin two to three weeks before blemishes are visible on your skin, the secret to controlling acne is prevention. Acne actually takes about eight to 12 weeks to treat. Dermatologists recommend a three pronged approach for topical acne treatment: First, unclog pores; second, control bacteria; and third, reduce inflammation.


Acne Myths

There are many myths about how acne should or should not be treated:


  • You should scrub your face clean in order to treat acne. This is false. Vigorous washing and scrubbing can actually irritate the skin and make acne worse. The best approach to good hygiene and acne is to gently wash your face twice a day with a mild soap, pat dry, and then use an appropriate acne treatment.

  • You have to let acne run its course. This is false. Acne can be cleared up. By using a high quality, efficacious acne skin care treatment system, you can address the three stages of the acne life cycle: clogged pores, bacteria, and inflammation.

  • Acne is just a cosmetic condition. This is false. While acne poses no serious threat to one's health, it does affect the way people look and can affect the way people feel about themselves. The P. acnes bacteria that can get trapped in pores and cause acne to multiply rapidly should be controlled. Acne should be taken seriously and treated to prevent permanent physical scarring.

  • Acne is caused by diet. This popular myth is not totally false. While thus far scientific studies have not found a solid connection between diet and acne, research is being revisited in this area. Some studies may indicate a relationship between high-glycemic foods such as sodas, pastries, and breads. Other studies have looked at the impact of dairy-rich diets on skin health. Many people insist that certain foods affect their acne. When this is the case, it makes sense to avoid those foods. As always, eating a balanced diet is never a bad idea.

  • There is no correlation between stress and acne. This is false. A recent study of Stanford University students with acne suggests that such a correlation exists. Students were analyzed before and after exams. The study found that students experienced a worsening of acne when under pre-exam stress. Clearly, acne not only causes significant stress, but is also made worse by stress. When you're under stress, your body produces stress hormones such as cortisol. Stress hormones like these may stimulate an overproduction of oil in the skin. When this excess oil mixes with dead skin cells and bacteria, it can cause acne to develop or become worse. This can, in turn, lead to more stress, plunging you into a stress-acne cycle.


Acne is a condition affecting millions of people. Its effects are not only physical, but emotional as well. Fortunately, acne can be treated and prevented. A total approach to fighting acne includes addressing issues presented by past, present, and future acne.

Alexa Boer Kimball
M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Clinical Trials Unit, Stanford University


As a board certified specialist in dermatology, Dr. Kimball advises Nu Skin on disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne, and superficial basal cell carcinoma. She is the director of the Clinical Unit for Research Trials in Skin at Harvard Medical School and serves as chair of the Workforce Taskforce for the American Academy of Dermatology. A significant contributor to current medical literature, Dr. Kimball has presented her research at medical and scientific symposia worldwide. She received her medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine and her masters of public health degree from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.



 


 

The Truth About Breakouts

Does eating chocolate give you zits? What about stress? Or the weather? You only have a breakout here and there so you don't have acne, right? It's time to reveal the truth about breakouts. While it's a myth that chocolate causes pimples, stress can aggravate your skin. By kicking off the release of androgens—hormones that produce a sticky oil in hair follicles—stress can be the culprit behind breakouts weeks before they surface. As far as the weather goes, breakouts are more likely to occur on hot, humid days because your skin can be aggravated by heat and friction. And yes, even one pimple is considered acne.


It actually takes about two weeks for acne to reach the surface of the skin. That's why, when you start treating acne, it's normal to see flare-ups. Usually you won't start to see results until the third or fourth week. For this reason it's important to be patient with a new acne treatment regimen.


Acne begins when hair follicles get plugged by sebum, an oily substance made by your skin. In those who are acne prone, this oil gets trapped in the narrow follicle, causing cells to clump and form a plug—phase one of a blemish.


Phase two occurs when bacteria, which love the air-tight environment created by the plug, start feeding and breeding inside the pores. The body responds by sending white blood cells to fight these bacterial invaders. This results in phase three: inflammation—small pink bumps, pimples, and sometimes nodules and cysts. It is this inflammation that results in scarring, dark marks, and discoloration.


When does acne stop? Most people see their acne improve as they get older. However, some people don't get acne until they are in their 20s, 30s, or even 40s. The bad news is some of the effects of past acne can last a lifetime. The good news is breakouts and the signs of past acne can be treated with the help of modern science so everyone can enjoy clear, healthy skin.

Alexa Boer Kimball
M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Clinical Trials Unit, Stanford University


As a board certified specialist in dermatology, Dr. Kimball advises Nu Skin on disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne, and superficial basal cell carcinoma. She is the director of the Clinical Unit for Research Trials in Skin at Harvard Medical School and serves as chair of the Workforce Taskforce for the American Academy of Dermatology. A significant contributor to current medical literature, Dr. Kimball has presented her research at medical and scientific symposia worldwide. She received her medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine and her masters of public health degree from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.


 

 

 

Steps to Healthy Skin

Beautiful skin is a product of the skin you were born with and the way you care for that skin as you age. Just as the rest of your body has changing needs as it grows, your skin also needs to develop and maintain a healthy structure as it evolves over time. The good news is that because we have been able to develop so many scientifically based approaches to improving skin health, there are a variety of products available to treat all kinds of problems. Unfortunately, because there are so many choices, it can sometimes be confusing and difficult to find the best skin care products for your skin. This article will provide tips on which products will benefit your skin if you have specific needs beyond the basic level.

 

Basic Skin Care Steps

There are several essential needs of the skin that you should address on a regular basis. People of all skin types need to cleanse, hydrate, and protect every day. Adding a toner can also help prepare the skin to receive the benefits from other products.

 

1) Cleanse: This step meets the skin’s basic need to be free of excess oil, dirt, and pollutants. If these impurities are not removed, you may experience dull, sallow skin; clogged, inflamed pores that can discolor and scar; or free radical oxidation that can damage cells, affect healthy cell renewal, irritate the skin, and initiate hyperpigmentation. To avoid these negative effects, you should cleanse twice daily.

2) Tone: Toning fulfills a basic daily need by preparing the skin to receive the benefits from other products and should be performed twice daily, after cleansing. Toning works in several ways. It calms and soothes the skin and also minimizes the appearance of pores and balances the skin’s pH.

3) Protect: The protect step meets the skin’s basic need for a morning moisturizer with SPF to guard against harmful UV rays and environmental stressors. Sun damage degrades the moisture barrier and structural proteins and promotes discoloration—all signs of premature skin aging.

4) Hydrate: The hydrate step provides vital lipids, replenishing moisture, and key repair components for optimal nighttime recovery. Nighttime hydration should be applied every evening.

 

Advanced Needs

In addition to the basic daily needs, the skin also has advanced needs that can be met by incorporating additional regimen steps designed to address specific concerns as needed. Starting in our late 20s, our advanced needs steadily increase. Consider some of the following advanced needs:

 

  • Treatments: The treat step meets an essential advanced need of the skin when key components, functions, or structures within the skin are compromised, leading to signs of premature aging. Treatment products are specially formulated to target those key signs of aging. 

      

For protecting skin health and maintaining youthfulness, you can nourish the skin with powerful              antioxidants to neutralize free radicals that damage and prematurely age the skin.

 

Spa-like Treatments:

  • Refinish: The refinish treatment benefits skin that has become dull and rough. Refinishing helps to resurface and polish the skin for a fresh, glowing complexion.

  • Exfoliate: When environmental stressors and biological aging begin to interfere with healthy cell renewal, exfoliating becomes importantExfoliation helps remove dead cell buildup for smoother, more youthful looking skin and can stimulate the cell renewal process.

  • Mask: Masks provide a concentrated application of key ingredients for an extended period of time. Masks also provide an excellent way to meet the skin’s various needs by delivering key ingredients to the skin and drawing out impurities. 

  • Galvanic Spa: Restore vibrancy, rebuild cellular energy, and fight the sources of aging with the Galvanic Spa. This treatment can be done up to three times per week after cleansing and toning.

 

Regimen Rules

When following a skin care regimen, it is vital that you use each product correctly. In addition to following specific instructions for each product, keep these tips in mind:

  • The advanced steps—refinish, exfoliate, mask, and Galvanic Spa—can be performed either morning or evening, but should not be performed twice in one day. Also, these steps only need to be performed five or six times per week.

  • With some core systems, the refinish, exfoliate, and mask steps are not recommended for simultaneous use (refer to individual treatment systems for more information).

  • When applying more than one treatment product, apply impenetrable products last.